text

Enhanced from the archives,...

archive

1947 Standard Eight:
a British car produced between 1938 to 1959 - the Eight is for the original HORSEPOWER, not # cylinders! 1957, the last edition: "The new engine of 803 cc produced slightly less power than the outgoing larger sidevalve unit with 26 bhp at 4500 rpm but this was increased to 30 bhp at 5000 rpm in 1957. "An example tested by The Motor magazine in 1953 had a top speed of 61 mph (98 km/h) and could accelerate from 0–50 mph (80 km/h) in 26.5 seconds."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Eight

archive



archive

1946-1947 Hudson pickup Nothing much to say, other than earlier version firsts: - dual brakes - dashboard oil-pressure and generator warning lights - a balanced crankshaft, allowing the straight-six to work smoothly at a higher rotational speed

archive





archive

The Chevrolet Master Deluxe was manufactured between 1933 and 1942. There were 302,728 Master Deluxe sold in 1938. Note the shadow...no big deal; I just like it. I took this in Enfield, CT today at a coffee gathering I just happened to see. The owner did ALL the work.

archive

archive

1948 Dodge The hood ornament, if true, is diagnostic Shoot!!! 1946...typo...even more rare. A gorgeous specimen, not to mention color.

archive





archive

1935 Ford Model 48 woodie: Note the provision in the grille to hand crank the no longer offered 4-cylinder Model A engine. This is a V8 with electric start. No way to get the hand crank to the flywheel, but got to accommodate older technology, just in case. Two windshield wipers was an option. The wooden panels were manufactured from Ford owned lumber.

archive




wawona

Betty McConnell sent this photo of her grandparents (grandfather standing), in a Pierce Arrow, at the Wawona Tree, Yosemite National Park. "Pierce-Arrow also persisted with right-hand drive until 1921 because it was safer to get out on the curb or ditch side, and for chauffeurs, it was easier for them to open the rear door for passengers."
Jay Leno Garage
Click on the image for enlargement. Thank you Betty.